01.09.2019
 Exam Response Essay

Exam Response A

Qu. 7 TAG 36

Jean Anne Duffy and Sheenagh Pugh both equally use their poetry to write down about youth and the means of growing up. Although the reveal many of the same ideas, like the idea that this prey upon the chasteness of youngsters, their different ways to the subject subject mean that the poems are usually vastly distinct. In Lizzie, six, Jean Anne Duffy presents a dysfunctional romance between a young girl and a man, quite possibly her daddy or step-father. Duffy presents the comparison between adulthood and junior through the use of two voices which in turn contrast starkly with one another. The child's voice begins with a very nice tone, with simple but happy vocabulary. Words just like " moon… fields…love” are generally very non-threatening, and mean a certain flexibility, if only the child's flexibility of thoughts. However , the tone from the child's tone gradually turns into more sinister, until the final line " I'm afraid of the dark”. In addition to the prevalent connotations of black addressing evil and isolation, this might signify the change in your child, who, since she is growing up is forced to lose her youthful creativeness and curiosity as a result of the abuse the girl suffers. The structure of Lizzie, six also makes tension. The division into five stanza's of the same length, every single with a single question, the child's answer and two lines from the adult's response create an acute perception of repeating, and the repeated monotony of the structure echoes the repeating nature of child abuse, which will seems with this poem being escalating. The simple fact that the last word of each and every stanza – " there… chair… stair… bare… care” rhymes increases this dull throb of repetition. The contrast between voice of Lizzie and her berner is severe, and perhaps Duffy wished for this contrast to reflect the changes one goes thru in the move from kid to adult. One approach which features the comparison is the usage of the same word by the child and adult. For example , " deep in the wood / I'll give you wood” reveals the damage of fresh innocence and creates an incredibly sinister sculpt, which in turn is made to disturb you. Sheenagh Pugh approaches thinking about the contrast between youth and adulthood in a different way in her poem Sweet 18. This poem is written as a first-person monologue, making the content even more sinister and shocking towards the reader while Pugh is usually exposing thought's which would usually remain hidden. This kind of poem also disturbs you, but unlike Duffy Pugh introduces the thought of a intimate relationship between the youth and woman. Nevertheless , Pugh's Nice 18 is just like Lizzie 6th in that this presents the adult while destroying the youth. This is certainly perhaps most apparent in the line " of a fresh sapling as well as using his life, sucking it out of him”. This can be clearly saying, if provided the chance, the and older can destroy the fresh. Lizzie 6 is certainly not the only poem in which Duffy raises tips surrounding youngsters. Boy is a first person monologue presented from your view of any man who wishes having been still young. This poem focuses on the safety most people think when they are kids, and the range " The earth is terror” clearly illustrates that this tone has not produced the usual changeover from boy to young adult to guy, and psychologically he feels more like a kid. The character's mental child-like state is definitely conveyed by simply Duffy through a mixture of terminology and his usage of short phrases. In this composition some paragraphs comprise of only 1 sentence, " Just like that. Whoosh. Hairy. ”, which simple structure projects the idea that the character feels as though, and thus discussions like, a child. However , within the last two stanzas the tone of the composition becomes a a bit more sinister. First of all, Duffy shows that this person had been in a sexual romance with a woman who this individual called " Mummy”. This breaks a strict sociable taboo with regards to parents, kids and intimate relationships, and as a result of this you is somewhat...